Tip Archive

Nutrition tip: For lasting fullness and energy, reduced cravings and overeating, combine protein and carbs together for every meal and snack....

Ensure that you warm-up properly and stay warm in preparation for competition.  Research shows that a 1-degree Celsius rise in muscle temperature can increase power output by 4%....

Standing on one foot while brushing your teeth is an easy way to work on ankle proprioception every day....

Pressure: We often feel pressure to perform, managing it takes practice. Pressure affects us physically, mentally and emotionally which impacts our ability to perform at the highest level. Your capacity to perform well under pressure depends on your view of the situation, do you see it as crisis or a challenge?...

Resistance rubber tubing can wear out or break over time. To get most use from your tubing there are some simple maintenance steps you can follow:

  1. Inspect your tubing before each use:
    Nicks and cuts will decrease the strength of the tubing and lead to breakage. If you notice a cut in your tubing it is time to for a replacement. Do not store you tubing in a box with sharp objects or tools and keep it away from sharp corners if you are tying it to
  2. ...

Rubber tubing can play an important role in an athlete’s strength program, particularly when they are travelling.

It is important to note, as tubing is stretched the resistance increases, the longer the tubing is stretched the harder it gets to stretch it further. For many exercises, you will stand on the middle of the tubing with one foot so that there is equal resistance in each hand.  Adjusting your foot position will increase or decrease the resistance. Standing on the tubing...

When starting a strength training program begin with two sessions per week, increase to three after 3-4 months and then move onto a more advanced program, training four or more times per week after 6-8 months of training.

Strength training affects more than the muscles - bones, connective tissue, your heart, and nervous system are all stressed during training. These organs and tissues do not all recover or adapt at the same rate so while the muscles have recovered from one...

One of the most persistent myths in strength training is that muscle soreness represents progress and that if you are not sore the next day you did not work hard enough. This is based on the notion that breaking down the muscle causes them to increase in size and strength. This is an overly simplistic approach to a series of very complex physiological changes at the cellular level involving many hormones, growth factors, and nutrients. There is little scientific evidence that breaking down...

Approximately 80% of the injuries that occur during strength training are because of poor technique. When you push yourself to the point that you can no longer lift the weight, the last couple of repetitions are usually done with less than perfect technique. During the first 4-6 months of training, when your body is still learning to perfect the movements avoid training to failure, stop the set when you or your training partner first notice that your technique is starting to break down...

Even with the best prevention practices, injuries can still happen. Make sure you identify your integrated support team before the season starts so that if an injury arises it can be managed in a timely manner to minimize the disruption to training....

A proper warm-up should prepare the athlete physically, physiologically and psychologically for training/competition. It should include elements such as moderate intensity activity to increase your heart rate, breathing rate and tissue temperature; mobility and flexibility exercises to ensure the joints/muscles have enough range for the required sport; neuromuscular activation, agility and proprioception exercises to prepare the body for the quick reactions needed during training/competition...

Recovery from training/competition is just as important as the training itself. It allows the body to return to its ready state so that you can train or compete at your peak the following day. Strategies such as active recovery, nutrition and sleep can all help with recovery. Be sure to implement these strategies in to your daily routine to improve performance and prevent injury....

Travelling from a generally colder climate like Ontario to a hotter and humid climate such as California, Mexico and South America, presents challenges to exercising people. This is because our body is not yet adjusted (acclimatized) to these new ambient conditions. Before a sporting event, train in the heat, with more layers on, or arrive well in advance (5 days) before the competition allowing your body to adjust to the hotter climate....

Maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) is a physiological variable that is measured in a laboratory exercise test. An elevated VO2max is often associated with better performance in longer sporting events like triathlon, road cycling and distance running. However, improving VO2max with exercise training is associated with improved health due to stronger and better functioning heart, lungs and muscles....

Already keeping a log book? When was the last time you looked over past entries and thought critically about any patterns or themes that emerged? This can be a great exercise to review your overall progress, as well as give some insight into what overall trends are emerging with regards to your performance....

Do you have a log book? If not, this can be a great way to track your progress and keep notes about what is going well, and what needs improvement with regards to your performance. Spend a few minutes after each practice and/or competition to track things like: What went well? What did you struggle with? What do you need to focus on more for next time? What is your plan to improve that?...

If you ever find yourself flustered or distracted, ask yourself “What is the one process or action I need to focus on right now?” This can often help you refocus on the task at hand, and get back into an effective rhythm....

Training specificity is important for improving performance. But how do you monitor your training to ensure you are meeting specific demands of your competition? There are many simple and inexpensive tools available to provide you with accurate feedback about your training and augment the feedback from your coach. Some examples include tempo trainers for cyclical sports (i.e. http://www.finisinc.com/tempo-trainer-pro) and...

Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs) provide a cost-effective and non-invasive way to help monitor your training and provide feedback in real time. In the gym, devices such as I Measure U (http://imeasureu.com/) and PUSH (https://www.trainwithpush.com/) can help you to track load, intensity, and speed of movement to ensure your...

There are a growing number of Performance Analysis tools available for your mobile device. For example, MySprint App (http://www.mysprintapp.com/) can help you estimate sprint running performance, SwimAnalyzer App (https://swimanalyzer.com/) can help with swimming race analysis, and Swing Smart can analyze your golf swing (http://...

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